You are NOT your label

For many months I have been wanting to write about Suneetha (name changed) who has been talking to me over the phone, ever since she read my article about recovery from mental illness in the Hindu newspaper. Suneetha told me that she had a schizophrenia diagnosis for over two decades of her life and she had been on a number of medications for that and then the comorbidities that appeared later.

One of the key things for her nowadays is SLE (lupus in some form) and then irritable bowel syndrome, which keeps her movements outside her home restricted. When I heard her story long back, I figured she had no reasons for a schizophrenia diagnosis at all. She was given some simple tablet, which could very well  have been a placebo for all the doctor cared, but he certainly gave her a label. She was in her school going years then. Many things happened, including marriage, divorce, brother’s suicide, mother’s death and so forth. Her medications increased over time but none of them had anything to do with her schizophrenia diagnosis, but sometimes memory, sometimes stomach, sometimes concentration. She feels the need to go and seek medical help for these conditions, which I feel basically happen because she is alone, alone and alone! I sometimes admire her courage to live alone and manage to spend a day by herself. It takes a lot for a single woman to survive, without much social support, a job or any significant relationships. It is very courageous indeed.

On this blog sometimes I want to note the interactions I have with this woman, who is now in her early forties, is fearful of going out of her home because she has fear that she may have to go to evacuate her bowels suddenly, as the bowel movement is not predictable, and that has made her life very limited in many ways. Many a times I just talk to her for a short while, 35-30 minutes and offer her courage and alternative ways of looking at her life, which she does not mind considering for the time we talk and even later.

I think the only thing people need is a voice to offer them courage, hope and remind them that there is a reason to be alive. She just now told me that she was very suicidal for the last two weeks, just like her brother (she said). And then she felt better by staying closely connected to her sister’s daughter. Even earlier she has expressed to me that she is happy to be with younger children. So I wondered then why not she go and work in a school, of young children, instead of wanting to work in an engineering job, just because she trained to be an engineer? Is it so difficult to choose happiness, I wondered? Perhaps she  understood and at my recommendation she has been looking around for a school job for the last few months and no longer focusing on getting a job in a company or corporate.

On a parting note she said that she just wanted to hear my voice, instead of writing an email to me, because she feels a lot calmer, once she hears me. And I thought, how much she would benefit if she could be in regular interaction with different sorts of people, who do not constantly remind her of her diagnosis but see what good she offers to them. This is the general tone of my dialogues also with her- building hope and courage. I hope to see new changes in her life, for I can see she is trying to create a new story, and go beyond her diagnosis. I feel just a little more time and things will start looking up. I have to remind her and myself that jobs are not so easy to come by these days, as there is a recession in the market, all over the world, whether we are aware of it or not.

I have hope because the channels of communication are open and many things can flow on those pathways. Recovery included.

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